What does the science say? Eggs and heart health


The connection between eggs and heart health has been studied for decades. When examined all at once, what does this science reveal? Dr. Dominik Alexander sought to find out by performing a comprehensive meta-analysis of egg and heart health studies from around the world.

Join Dr. Alexander, Principal Epidemiologist with EpidStat Institute, for this webinar as he presents findings from his meta-analysis of studies exploring egg consumption and risk of coronary heart disease and stroke. Collectively, these studies showed that up to one egg daily was associated with a small reduction in stroke risk while regular egg intake was not associated with either increasing or decreasing the risk of coronary heart disease.

Presented by Egg Farmers of Canada. This webinar took place on June 6 2017, from 12-1pm EST. Watch the full webinar below!

About the researcher

Dominik D. Alexander, PhD, MSPH, is the Principal Epidemiologist with EpidStat Institute based in Ann Arbour, Michigan. He has extensive experience in health research methodology, meta-analysis, and disease causation, particularly in the conceptualization, design, analysis, and interpretation of epidemiologic studies. He has published on a diverse range of topics and types of studies, including original epidemiologic research, qualitative reviews, systematic weight-of-evidence assessments, and quantitative meta-analyses.

Because of his expertise in research methodology, Dr. Alexander has served as principal investigator on numerous projects involving a wide variety of exposures and health outcomes. His research areas include: occupational and environmental exposures, such as asbestos, benzene, trichloroethylene, solvents, pesticides, arsenic, and dioxin; community health studies and cluster investigations involving air, water, and soil exposures; clinical, pharmacoepidemiology, and medical device studies including clinical trial design and support. In addition, Dr. Alexander has extensive experience in nutritional epidemiology and has conducted systematic reviews and meta-analyses of dietary and nutritional factors and cancer, cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and body composition. His work in this area has involved studies of dietary patterns, intake of whole foods, and dietary supplements, such as meat and fat intake, dairy and egg consumption, breakfast eating, multivitamin and mineral supplements, fish oil, caffeine, and infant formula.

Learn more about EFC’s research programs here.